Drawing & painting with light

There's something about materialization, tangibility, the physical presence of an artwork, not being able to see pixels or mathematical digital perfection.

No matter if they're obvious or just slightly visible imperfections; flaws, irregularities not only make you aware of the fact that someone handmade a piece with craftsmanship; the experience probably goes beyond this technical glorification.

When 3D artist have to animate a convincing image they'll spend a lot of time adding textures, lens distortion, bumps, scratches and other noise. It is the layer of noise that creates an image we can more easily relate to, something we recognize, something that feels familiar to our everyday experience of the actual physical world.

When drawing on slides (reversal film) and then projecting/enlarging them, two things happen. On one hand you magnify the limitations of drawing on a small sized 20mm x 30mm surface, you start seeing dust and fingerprints. But also fascinating is the physical experience of the enlarged image with the specs of dust and the scratches, yet only visible by the projected intangible light.

Breathing scape - graphite on paper, 108cm x 75,5cm
Breathing scape - graphite on paper, detail
Breathing scape - graphite on paper, detail
Hands holding a landscape - graphite on paper,  108cm x 75,5cm
Hands holding a landscape - graphite on paper, detail
Hands holding a landscape - graphite on paper, detail
Breathing scape - markers on reversal film
Breathing scape - markers on reversal film, studio view
Breathing scape, double - markers on reversal film
Landscape in a plate - markers on reversal film
Landscape in a plate - markers on reversal film
Landscape in a plate - markers on reversal film
Paper scape - markers on reversal film